This Newsletter is organized as follows: Results: Biodiversity compensation in France is not a market-based instrument Methods: QUICKScan: Development of a participatory spatial analysis tool in WP3 Results: Historical analysis of market-based instruments sheds light on current confusion Partners’ publications and events

Newsletter Invaluable N°2

November 2013

Abstract

The INVALUABLE project aims at studying the emergence of market-based instruments (MBIs) for ecosystem services and biodiversity. Taking stock of a multitude of understandings and perceptions by a variety of stakeholders on the very concept of MBIs, the project explores their theoretical background and related discourses.

Indeed, before reporting on the impacts, risks and opportunities of these policy instruments, it appears necessary to identify and further distinguish between contrasted categories of instruments with little common ground. Besides, the careful analysis of discourses associated to the realm of MBIs is also critical to improve our research, as it will enable partners in the project to shy away from ideological views carried by a number of stakeholders – to the extent that such neutrality is deemed possible in social sciences. Over the past six months, the various teams involved in the project have made great progress on a number of issues, and this second newsletter presents some of these advances.

From a methodological standpoint, the Wageningen team has started to apply (for the purposes of further refinement) a Decision Support System (DSS) that aims to stimulate exchanges between policy makers and knowledge producers. The ultimate expectation is the generation of more informed policies (see page 3 of this newsletter). The testing and refinement process provides invaluable information for studying the impacts of knowledge dissemination on the evolving attitudes of stakeholders and their capacity to assimilate evidence and modify decisions accordingly. The work undertaken by the Wageningen team is especially interesting from a methodological perspective as it combines artificial experiments (with students) and real-world cases in The Netherlands.

This study takes place within a broader body of research as part of the INVALUABLE project and in which the University of Freiburg participates: both institutions collaborate in organizing an international workshop on science-policy interfaces (SPIs) in March 2014 (see page 5 of this newsletter). This forward-looking approach that involves exante assessments nicely complements other attempts to promote cutting-edge methods for the ex-post impact assessment of forest conservation policies. Indeed, INVALUABLE is providing financial support for the organisation of another international workshop on the matter, which will be held in Barcelona at the end of the year (see page 5 of this newsletter).

This Newsletter is organized as follows:

  • Results: Biodiversity compensation in France is not a market-based instrument
  • Methods: QUICKScan: Development of a participatory spatial analysis tool in WP3
  • Results: Historical analysis of market-based instruments sheds light on current confusion
  • Partners’ publications and events

 
Online access: http://www.iddri.org/Projets/Invaluable
Download pdf: Newsletter INVALUABLE 2_November 2013